Favorite Brushes

 

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ART, 8″ x 8″ Oil painting by Lisa David Remember wearing your Dad’s old shirt and using those long brushes? Art class was the best special of the week.

Every artist has them:  their favorite brushes. Over time, your favorites end up like Woody in Toy Story – tossed in the back row or put in some old brush jar, part of your personal museum of art supplies. I bet you have a collection. If you’re like me, you don’t throw out old art supplies. You think one day, you may need them, or maybe your children will want them. Maybe, just maybe, some collector will find them valuable!

Oh, the stories your old brushes could tell. They know all your secrets. The time you had to repaint over that garish green, or how many times you wiped down and restarted. Our brushes have personalities. Some are sharp, giving us a quick edge. Others are dull, glazing over quiet areas. Brushes can be downright ugly misshapen unfortunates, bristles going this way and that.  Even your once favorite brush can go bald after a while, losing precious hair. You think, “I didn’t even notice and now you’re practically bald”.

Paint brush cleaning
Clean paint brushes with Murphy’s Oil Soap, baby oil or olive oil soap.

Brushes are extensions of our brains and hearts. When you reach for a brush for that specific stroke, it’s best to get it right the first time. The brush must work in harmony with the paint. If the paint is too thick, too thin or not the color you thought you mixed, it can sense your frustration. Sometimes, we take our frustration out on our brushes. We forcefully rinse them in solvent, then blot with too much pressure on the paper towel. Sometimes we even throw them in fits of rage (well, I don’t, but you know who you are!)

Certain brushes become our very favorite. The “in ” brush – the popular brush. You bring it out for every painting, even take it on plein air adventure outings. Then, there are the cheap brushes. The discount brushes on sale at the big box art store. Come on, you know the kind. You can’t resist their low price.  Once in a great while, you may find a quiet, little unassuming brush.  It’s almost too good to be true – the price was right and it did the job.

Lisa David artist studio brushes
My studio paint brushes, Gamsol solvent & Viva paper towels.

Painters have their favorite supplier, too. And soon, when you thought you were the only one with the cool new brushes, everyone else has them and you are all painting the strokes!

Your brush truly is your most important tool. How it feels in your hand, the weight, the texture of its finish, the feel of the bristles as they glide on the canvas. If only some magic could flow through them like Tinkerbell’s wand!

Lisa David artist brushes
Brushes I used down to practically nothing. Hey- ya never know when you’ll need one bristle!

I paint with a woman who uses only one brush! That’s it! It’s a short flat, probably a number 4 or 6. Yes, I agree, flats are a good versatile brush. If I’m being honest, I could get by with about 5 brushes. So why the need to continuously purchase more? Luckily, for the Rosemary Brush Company, I can’t seem to get enough!

Of course, cleaning brushes is also part of the artist’s job. At the end of each day’s painting, I give my brushes a little massage for working so hard. I use either Murphy’s Oil Soap or baby oil in the palm of my hand. Then, using olive oil bar soap, I gently squeeze paint from the ferrule down.  Then, I lay them flat to dry.  When I start the next day’s painting session, these lucky brushes end up in the front row instead of back on the bench. Every few months, the weeding out process begins again, and those Woody brushes get put in a special container as if to say, someday we’ll be used again- someday. And so goes the life of a paintbrush.

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