Why produce a series of paintings?

Lisa David, The Chase

Lisa David, The Chase, 16″ x 20″. Remember chasing the ice cream man with your dollar?

We all have them – our personal favorite painting, the baby, the one painting you were born to paint! Sometimes, we get lucky. Perfect combination of subject, composition, value structure, color harmony – it just works. That one painting may inspire an entire series. Before you know it, your authentic self as a painter, your style, shows itself. That’s what happened to me. The Chase is a painting of two kids wearing nothing but swim trunks chasing an ice cream truck. Everyone remembers the excitement of hearing the ice-cream truck’s song fill the neighborhood. “ICE CREAM MAN!”, we would scream, then run to find loose change and hope he didn’t get away. That painting has set the course for most of my work since. Childhood memories infiltrate everything I paint. If you are struggling with finding your voice and distinguishing yourself as an artist, maybe your favorite painting can be an inspiration for a series.

Below: Images from the “Summer as it was…” series.

Over the past five years, I have immersed myself into several series of paintings rooted in memory, specifically childhood memories. They have produced enough work for galleries, shows and studio sales. I’ve done a series of 70 small paintings about summer in the 1960’s and 1970’s; a series of ten summer drinks from the 1960’s and 1970’s; a series of 28 paintings of family on a 28-day road trip in 1972. Currently, I am working on a series of 12 paintings about school in the era of Dick and Jane.

 

Below: Images from the “Summer Refreshment” series.

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Frozen Pink Lemonade, 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel Remember the sound the frozen lemonade concentrate would make as it left the can and the stickiness it made all over the counter?

coke and a smile

Coke and a Smile. 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel Remembering just how refreshing an ice cold Coke can be.

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(Mr. Harvey’s) Suntea , 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel My 5th grade teacher made us suntea in a big glass jar. It would marinate in the window all morning long. We drank it out of little Dixie papercups.

Tubosoda

Tub O’ Soda, 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel That time I won a green raft for the 3-legged race at my Dad’s company picnic. There were tubs of soda like I had never seen before!

Prior to painting, I threw pots. Lots of pots. I was a production potter throwing hundreds of pounds of clay a week fulfilling orders for gift shops all over the country and abroad. I had 18 sales reps selling my wares at wholesale prices which barely left any profit for all my hard work. My passion turned to excruciating work and before I knew it, I resented dry hands, sore back and the constant hum of my pottery wheel. I barely slept. Something had to change. I decided to paint. Years later, the same principles that helped me produce shelves of pottery helped me produce series of paintings.

Lisa David Summer of 72 poster image

Lisa David, Summer of 72 A family goes on a 28 day roadtrip; Some real memories, some imagined.

It’s satisfying to complete a body of work, a series of paintings. It feels good to have paintings for galleries, shows and sales. It also feels good to tell people what you are working on. Here are a few tips to help you if you want to tackle a series of paintings:

  1. Determine the number, size and subject of a series. Set parameters about when you will finish (a painting a day, season, month). Pick a good number, then use social media, blog, etc. so others can follow your journey. Make it a realistic number. The summer I painted one a day was a huge commitment.
  2. Source items if you’re doing still-lifes or take photo references combined with observational work. I keep a sketchbook and draw thumbnails for each image. I have bought a few rather bizarre things off eBay to paint, like an old metal ice-cube maker, pick-up stick game, even an old orange life preserver!
  3. Have gumption and stay with the idea until it is complete even if you doubt your skills and subject. I use the word “GUMPTION” as my mantra and listen to the Hans Zimmer song Gumption from the movie The Holiday! It keeps me painting through anything. There were times when I thought, am I nuts painting Tang, cinnamon toast or Yodels? I may be nuts, but at least I’m being authentic.
  4. Contact venues for showing your latest series. Tell people what you are painting.
  5. Set up for success: order supplies to see it through, clean your studio before you start, plan times to paint, tell your family that you’ve decided to make the commitment. Take the series seriously.
  6. Enjoy every second – painting is the good stuff!
  7. And remember, if something is important to you, you will find a way. If not, you will find an excuse.

Happy Painting…and give Gumption a try!

Favorite Brushes

 

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ART, 8″ x 8″ Oil painting by Lisa David Remember wearing your Dad’s old shirt and using those long brushes? Art class was the best special of the week.

Every artist has them:  their favorite brushes. Over time, your favorites end up like Woody in Toy Story – tossed in the back row or put in some old brush jar, part of your personal museum of art supplies. I bet you have a collection. If you’re like me, you don’t throw out old art supplies. You think one day, you may need them, or maybe your children will want them. Maybe, just maybe, some collector will find them valuable!

Oh, the stories your old brushes could tell. They know all your secrets. The time you had to repaint over that garish green, or how many times you wiped down and restarted. Our brushes have personalities. Some are sharp, giving us a quick edge. Others are dull, glazing over quiet areas. Brushes can be downright ugly misshapen unfortunates, bristles going this way and that.  Even your once favorite brush can go bald after a while, losing precious hair. You think, “I didn’t even notice and now you’re practically bald”.

Paint brush cleaning

Clean paint brushes with Murphy’s Oil Soap, baby oil or olive oil soap.

Brushes are extensions of our brains and hearts. When you reach for a brush for that specific stroke, it’s best to get it right the first time. The brush must work in harmony with the paint. If the paint is too thick, too thin or not the color you thought you mixed, it can sense your frustration. Sometimes, we take our frustration out on our brushes. We forcefully rinse them in solvent, then blot with too much pressure on the paper towel. Sometimes we even throw them in fits of rage (well, I don’t, but you know who you are!)

Certain brushes become our very favorite. The “in ” brush – the popular brush. You bring it out for every painting, even take it on plein air adventure outings. Then, there are the cheap brushes. The discount brushes on sale at the big box art store. Come on, you know the kind. You can’t resist their low price.  Once in a great while, you may find a quiet, little unassuming brush.  It’s almost too good to be true – the price was right and it did the job.

Lisa David artist studio brushes

My studio paint brushes, Gamsol solvent & Viva paper towels.

Painters have their favorite supplier, too. And soon, when you thought you were the only one with the cool new brushes, everyone else has them and you are all painting the strokes!

Your brush truly is your most important tool. How it feels in your hand, the weight, the texture of its finish, the feel of the bristles as they glide on the canvas. If only some magic could flow through them like Tinkerbell’s wand!

Lisa David artist brushes

Brushes I used down to practically nothing. Hey- ya never know when you’ll need one bristle!

I paint with a woman who uses only one brush! That’s it! It’s a short flat, probably a number 4 or 6. Yes, I agree, flats are a good versatile brush. If I’m being honest, I could get by with about 5 brushes. So why the need to continuously purchase more? Luckily, for the Rosemary Brush Company, I can’t seem to get enough!

Of course, cleaning brushes is also part of the artist’s job. At the end of each day’s painting, I give my brushes a little massage for working so hard. I use either Murphy’s Oil Soap or baby oil in the palm of my hand. Then, using olive oil bar soap, I gently squeeze paint from the ferrule down.  Then, I lay them flat to dry.  When I start the next day’s painting session, these lucky brushes end up in the front row instead of back on the bench. Every few months, the weeding out process begins again, and those Woody brushes get put in a special container as if to say, someday we’ll be used again- someday. And so goes the life of a paintbrush.

If you have to paint from a photo…

Landscape painting reference photos

Reference photos I have used for studio paintings.

There’s a lot of debate in the art community about painting from a photo.  I was at a figure drawing class recently and the topic came up. There were several plein air painters in the group. There were also some newbies who didn’t quite understand the stigma related to both techniques. The debate went something like this: If you paint from life, your painting will be more lively, vibrant, have energy. It won’t look like a photo, it will look like a painting. You will get the colors and values accurate. The other side argued working from a photo allows you to paint on your own terms, in a studio. It offers the artist convenience and more freedom of subject matter. You are able to see details. You can take longer on a work.  It may look realistic. The rationale for each goes on and on.

I have my own opinions (as does everyone!). Basically, a painting is a painting. It’s not a photograph. The untrained eye will think the painting from a photo is “so good”. If it is tight and realistic, they may compliment it by saying “I thought that was a photo!” For a long time, I heard these statements. I thought this meant I was a good painter. I may be a good painter, but I want to be a good artist. I have become more aware and appreciative of paintings that show more of the artists brushwork and process. For me, being an artist means I am leaving a bit more of “me” on the canvas; my brushwork, my colors and my composition.

I studied photography in school. I have taken tens of thousands of photos. In fact, I have over 25,000 on my phone from the last year. Yikes, that’s a lot of photos! Anyway, I feel confident in my skills of composition and design. I learned to paint by copying my photos. But is the art in the photograph or in the painting? Recently have I discovered painting from life. I’m still copying what I see, but for some reason, I feel more like an artist! I get a rush from painting from life. I can interpret the colors and make bolder brush strokes.  Consider this: If I took a photo of the exact place I plein air paint, it would show a moment in time. A quick snap – a freeze frame. As a photo, it might be wonderful. Ideally, it would trigger an emotional response.  Now, if I stay in the same spot, becoming immersed while painting for a few hours, the experience would transfer onto the canvas.  And for many artists, they will use the plein air painting and a photo reference together for a studio painting.

It’s all just preference. Some artists have the propensity for details and getting every detail in their painting. There are collectors and art buyers who love to show off such works. Others prefer a more painterly approach, seeing the brushstrokes and the mark of the artist. While both techniques have their merits, here are a few tips to consider if painting from a photograph:

  1. Whenever possible, create a small painted study to accompany your photo. Not possible? Then draw a sketch. Not possible? Take some color notes. What colors would you mix? Jot down what the weather was like, or some words for your mood.
  2. If you must work from a photo, at least work from your own. Don’t use other’s photography. All you will be doing is showing your skills at copying. No fun.
  3. If you use a smart phone, keep it in portrait mode when possible. Also, make sure to keep the phone at same level and perpendicular to your vision. Distortion and wide lens are giveaways that you painted from a photo.
  4. Beware of shadows and highlights.  Your photo will obliterate the highlights. It will make all your shadows black.
  5. Make corrections immediately after taking the photo, while you are still in front of your subject.
  6. Take several photos in the same area, all around, all views.
  7. Compose ON THE SPOT if possible. It saves time and sharpens your vision as an artist.
  8. Find your focal point and soften the rest. Our eyes see differently than a camera. We cannot focus from one thing to the next. Try it! Look at something, anything in front of you. Now notice the extraneous objects surrounding the item you have focused on. You cannot make out their details. The camera flattens everything and shows you everything in clear focus but, we do not see that way.
  9. If you do paint from a photo, edit elements that won’t help your composition. Don’t put in every last item or detail. It can really weaken your painting
  10. Convert your photo to black and white to help see the values. This can be helpful if you are new to painting or just are having difficulty making them out.

Above all, remember that the camera is a tool. YOU are the artist, the one mixing the paints. YOU are the one reading the information and interpreting what you see. And only you can prevent forest fires. (Just seeing if you’re still with me!) All that really matters is that you are fortune enough to paint!

 

 

 

Signing Artwork

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Stack of unsigned paintings.

“Put your name on your paper”. It’s literally the first thing you are taught. Even as a high school teacher, I repeatedly say “no name, no fame”. But I’m the kid that totally ignores the teacher. I procrastinate signing my art. Guilty as charged. Why do I put it off? What’s all the fuss with signatures? What’s in a name, anyway? Apparently, a lot.

It was a big deal during the Renaissance for individual artists to sign their art.  Before that, artists often worked in collective guilds. Historically, signatures can provide authenticity to an artwork. I recently watched the show Fake or Fortune (highly recommended). In Season 4, episode 2, there is dispute over the legitimacy of a Renoir because he never signed it! The provenance (the lineage) is easier to maintain with a legitimate signature.

artist signature

Inscribing signature into wet paint, alla prima.

Typically, the last time an artist puts brush to painting is to sign it. The act of signing may be the culmination of hours, days or months’ worth of work. When I sign, it’s like the entire process flashes before my eyes. So many thoughts and decisions go into a work. Often, as an artist, it’s sometimes hard to know when the work is finished. Inevitably, though, every painting says, “I’m done, please, no more!” An artist friend looked at my signature once and thought I was signing it to mimic that of a Grandma Moses because it is so primitive, lacking any artistic flair! I laughed, “No,” I said. “It’s just my name”. But then I got to thinking. I sign my work L. David. I often wonder if I should just sign David, and if changing the style is acceptable so I did some research. Yes! Turns out, artists signatures evolve over time. And it’s about time my signature changes. Maybe on the next painting.

So, you are done with your painting and ready to sign. How? Where? Are there rules? Standards? Yes, and no. Typically, a work is signed in the lower right or left corner in the same media the work was created in. The size is similar to the signature on a check. Some artists only sign their last name. Others sign the first letter of their first name, and their last name. Some sign meticulously. Their signatures are works of art. Others use an illegible scribble. It is preferred by the art establishment that the signature be legible.  Art collectors and patrons want art that is signed and legible. If they are spending big bucks on a work, they want bragging rights and a legible signature helps.  The signature should not dominate or take attention away from the art.

artist signatures

Artist signatures

Studio painters may wait until the painting is dry before signing. This allows more control with the brush. Plein air painters don’t have that luxury. They typically will sign on location by inscribing the work or simply signing wet on wet (alla prima). Collectors are thrilled when the artist indicates (on the back) where the piece was painted and perhaps a bit of information to go along with it. For example, I painted this today and inscribed it with a rubber tipped tool. It was painted partially from my car and partially from just outside my car. It wasn’t cold, a balmy 34 degrees. It was at Gurney Park, in Glens Falls, NY, just inside the Adirondack Park. Lucky for me, there was a sledding birthday party. I didn’t bring any cadmium yellow and had to make the best with the colors I had. The kids were screaming and laughing as they sped down the hill. While I painted, my husband rode his mountain bike on nearby trails. t took about an hour and fifteen minutes to complete. So, now you know the story.

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Sledding Party, 6″x 8″ Oil on panel, plein air painting. Gurney Lane Park, Glens Falls, NY

Eighteenth century landscape artist Jean Baptiste Camille Corot has the distinction of being the most forged artist of all time. Art news reports  “Corot (1796–1875) was extremely prolific: he produced some 3,000 paintings and roughly the same number of drawings”, Dieterle says. Even today, real Corots still come to light “in someone’s attic or basement, at a flea market or estate sale.”

I find art forgery fascinating! Christies auction house has a great article about signing art. 

True Story: I recently delivered some work to a gallery. Lucky for me, a customer wanted to purchase one just a day later! I received a call asking me to come in; apparently, I forgot to sign the painting. I apologized profusely and the gallery said not to worry, it happens often.  Looks like we need to add one more thing to the artist’s checklist! And remember, no name, no fame!

 

 

 

 

Two kinds of people.

Richard Schmid Color Chart

Arrangement of color charts with template peeled off.

There are two kinds of people in the world: Those who believe in color charts, and those who roll their eyes like it’s a colossal waste of time and paint. I was in the first camp. I am also an admirer of artist Richard Schmid. Aside from being a master painter of landscapes, still life and the figure, Richard finds time to author some of the best art books I’ve ever read. I imagine Donald Sutherland’s voice reading his book. I haven’t yet had the pleasure of meeting Richard. In his book Alla Prima II, Schmid details how to make color charts using “his” palette of 12 colors. While there are websites that explain his technique and reasoning, I highly recommend purchasing the book. It is packed with relevant content relating to all aspects of painting. So, with a week off in the dead of winter, the time had come. Time to make the color charts.

RIchard Schmid color charts

My color charts DONE!

Prior to making color charts, I was a consummate brush dipper. I dipped my brush into colors; dab, dab, dab – two or three colors at a time. I cleaned my brush and did it again for the next color. I instinctively mixed colors. Mixing colors is a bit like cooking. Unfortunately, my Irish genes kick in when I cook. I don’t use recipes. Rarely.  So, when it came time to make the color charts, I was doubtful I would be successful.  I envisioned wasting paint and making a hot, albeit colorful, mess. But I discovered something about myself I never thought possible:  I can be methodical. I can be organized. I can slow down. I can see. I can improve. I can follow directions and I can be successful. I made colors I had never seen before! If oil paint was edible, I’d have gained five pounds. I was a paint-mixing mad ninja scientist!  It was tedious, crazy-making work. Here’s some practical advice for your chart making adventure:

  1. Save time and order pre-made color panels from Color Frontier. They arrived two days after I ordered them! They come with a palette knife and have an adhesive window template. When removed, it will reveal all your wonderful colors.
  2. It took me 3-4 days, not two weeks as others suggest. The first chart took the longest, each chart thereafter was easier because I learned the unique properties of each color. The colors reminded me of my students or pets. Some were pokey, like yellow ochre. I had to use a lot of that color to get colors to “move”; then Alizarin permanent was the sassy color, only needing a tiny bit. She is strong! You see, you will get punchy making the charts. I worked 6-8 hours a day for 3 days and an hour or so on the 4th day.
  3. Use baby wipes and towels to clean your palette knife each time you touch a color. I even found myself folding the paper towel methodically after each wipe. Place your garbage can nearby.
  4. Use a palette knife to apply the paint to the chart. It is easier to clean than a brush and teaches you about knife work. I used a small Italian palette knife that was the perfect size to apply the paint.
  5. Make all your variations of each color on your palette before putting it on panel. You will see the variations in front of you. It was easier to lighten or adjust the color mixes.
  6. Start with darkest. Next, mix the middle value, then the lightest. Lastly, make the in between values. Keep the 5 values in order on your palette – it is easier to see the subtle differences.
  7. Make enough of your base mixture for each of the subsequent 4 lighter values.
  8. Don’t contaminate tube colors you have laid out.
  9. I had a push pin, binder clip and wall space ready to hang each panel.
  10. Be “present” and take note of the colors as you go.

I’m so glad I took the time to make the charts. I am patiently waiting for them to dry so I can really study them. I think I will waste less paint, especially white. Knowing the tinting strength of colors is going to help tremendously.  And I can now say, I made the charts!

Are you getting better?

Lisa David oil painting blog plein air photos

Looking through my work, deciding what is working, and what is not!

I played the viola in the 5th grade. I probably ended up with the viola because I returned the permission slip late. I remember the screeching as the bow scraped across the strings. I could play Hot Cross Buns. The red velvet case, with the block of rosin, was all mine. I loved the smell of rosin. I was so cool. I was not so good. But I remember my Mom saying “Lee, you’re getting better!” As a high school drawing and painting teacher, I rarely say “you’re so good” because what is “good” anyway? I want my students to improve, to get better. As hard as we try to “get good” at something, the bar keeps moving and who determines what good is, anyway? Good is an arbitrary, subjective term. It’s a preference. My dog George is good. Pizza is good. Why not try to get better? Be better?
piles of paintings

Piles of “Never minds” painting.

I lined up my art in chronological order. After getting past my giant pile of “neverminds,” it was time to get serious. There are countless areas of improvements I could tackle. Composition, value structure, brushwork, color, edges, to name a few. I realized I am making the same error over and over. I decided deliberate brushwork is something I want to be better at. I tend to over-work and over-paint. I lay in too many colors (that sounds weird, but you know what I mean!) In order to improve, I need knowledge. We artists are nuts for information, googling everything until we are experts. So, I have started to read selected books, blog posts, articles about brushwork and actual paint application. I am watching videos, looking at details of master’s art on Google Art Project. With each painting, I am attempting to be more deliberate and focus on this one area of improvement. Why does it matter? Couldn’t I just keep on painting, throwing caution to the wind, content in the pieces I paint? Sure, I guess. It’s not like the painting police will take away my brushes. But I want to get better. And if you’re reading this, you want to get better, too. True story: Today, after two weeks of intense figure drawing lessons, I overheard my students say they finally “get it”. They said how after a few years of drawing people, they finally understand the steps. As they were filing out of my classroom, one student left her drawing face up on the pile. For a second, she just looked at it, pausing. In that moment, she was on top of the world. It’s a tiny gesture, but as a teacher, it meant the world to me. She was proud; confident. A minute later, another student asked for charcoal for more practice. Is she “good” at drawing? It doesn’t matter. She is better. She is on the path to improvement, where proud moments happen along the way.

What’s your story?… and why it matters!

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Leisure Time. 6″ x 6″ Oil on panel. Fond memories in this camper circa 1971.

Recently, I have noticed books, websites and podcasts for creative people about finding your authentic self – your true self.  Reason being, if you can tap into that, your art-making will be inspired from within, thus you’ll create more authentic and genuine pieces.  Why is this an important and necessary process?  Your art needs to have integrity. For you to defend your art as the “real thing” it needs your truth. When the art you make comes from within, you will see it on the canvas.  It has a ring of truth.  Your art will stand out and bring you peace. You will look forward to creating and sharing.

So how do know how to find your truth? Your story? We all have a story, a point of view. I wanted to find my truth. Should I read books, take personality tests, Google and listen to podcasts? My discovery of my story was relatively simple. I stopped looking outside to find out who I am.  No one knows me better than myself. My experiences, likes, dislikes, memories, ideas are only mine. I thought about it for a bit and looked at the work I most enjoy making and sharing. Then my story revealed itself. I’ll share it with you!

I’m a girl who loves the 60’s who was raised by a genius scientist and an alcoholic mother with a heart of gold. While she attempted domestic life, our suburban development house overwhelmed my mother. Four kids kept her busy. Erma Bombeck was her idol and voice of sanity. Someday, I’ll share the whole story. For now, let’s just say I watched a lot of TV to show me what normal life was. I yearned to live in the Brady Bunch house.  One fond memory I had growing up was camping at state campsites in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York. We were all crammed in a popup camper. It felt so great to be with other kids and families doing this “normal” activity.  So, camping has a strong hold on me. I have a log cabin in the Adirondack mountains which I use as a studio for summer painting.  I love pine trees and the color of pine needles. That’s who I am. I love vintage and the Adirondack landscapes. A lot has happened in my life along the way, but I can honestly say my love for life in the 60’s and the mountains pretty much consumes my thoughts. Simple? Sure.  And for now, that’s just fine for me. What’s your story? Listen to your inner voice….shhhhhh. Hear it?

Michne Family in our Leisure Time Camper

Staying cozy in the Leisure Time Camper, 1972. I’m the happy one in the back.

P.S. Timing is everything. I just started reading Larry Moore’s book, Fishing for Elephants. If you are struggling with finding your authentic self and your inner voice isn’t screaming at you to get your attention, Larry can do it for you! It’s a great read so far. Good luck in your journey, may you be at peace with your story.

Stop Painting! For a little while, anyway.

Stop painting…for a little while, anyway!

Plein Air Painting by artist Lisa David

Saturday in the Park, 8″ x 10″ Oil on Panel Plein air painting by Lisa David. Painted outside on a cold (18 degrees) day in Saratoga State Park, upstate, New York.

Do a painting, post a painting, do a painting, post a painting, update website, send emails, order supplies, look through photo references, paint another painting, post another painting. See the problem? I do. I’m not stopping for reflection and honest critique. No learning, no reading. My rhythm is all about making. I mistakenly think, if I don’t paint, I will get out of the groove. Does this sound familiar?

I am realizing it’s okay to stop.  Artists need to pause and reflect. The paint will be there waiting. We need to evaluate what we did so we don’t keep making the same mistakes. This may mean reading a book. I have about a dozen that have been waiting for me. It may mean spending money on a workshop or a class. It might mean sitting and watching videos. Or it might mean getting a mentor. If all we do is paint and post, there may not be growth. Mistakes are good. Honest criticism is healthy. Learning feels good. As an art teacher, after every project, my students have a critique. We talk about what worked, what didn’t. We discuss what they would do differently next time? I need to apply this critique to my own work. SLOW DOWN. It’s okay to spend time relaxing with a good book about composition or color.  So instead of going into my studio, I’m going to critique a painting I just finished. Here it is. A plein air painting I did in a park. It was a mere 18 degrees. Speed was necessary. I did not work on it back in the studio.

Plein Air Painting by artist Lisa David

Saturday in the Park, 8″ x 10″ Oil on Panel Plein air painting by Lisa David. Painted outside on a cold (18 degrees) day in Saratoga State Park, upstate, New York.

I like the looseness. Trees in the back are a bit boring- too much the same. Figures are good, lose- a bit clumsy. Tone of yellow seems too green. Texture of weeds could have more tooth. Birch trees okay- like that there are 3. Next time, vary tree line, work on the yellow tones, etc. What did I learn? Maybe premix colors when it’s too cold. Also, stop while painting and clean palette at each interval (foreground, middle ground and background). I’m sure there is much more I could learn and improve on this plein air study, but I’ll spare you, you get the point. Now, to go read!

Selecting a format: Square or horizontal

Lisa David Art square paintings

Four square paintings. Each with their own compositional challenges, but when 4 small squares make a new square, it’s kinda fun!

 

Square panel paintings have become all the rage.  I started a few years ago when I was doing daily paintings.  Art history is filled with horizontal rectangular landscapes.  It’s the most popular format when painting a landscape.  Oddly, most windows in houses are vertical!  Portrait painters will typically use a vertical rectangle, as a body when sitting is typically taller than it is wide.  And now, with computers, we select landscape format for horizontal and portrait format for vertical. But what if you decide a square? Will you be a square? No, quite the opposite because as Huey Lewis says, “It’s hip to be square”! All kidding aside, let’s consider the square format, pros and cons.

Cons: There are composition challenges to a square format. It is tempting to put your subject right in the middle of a square. Often, people who work from photos use the 3:2 format as that is what a traditional 35 mm ratio is.  Apple phones provides the photographer a few options. If you know you will be painting from a photo (although not recommended), then select the format first. It will eliminate decision making and get you comfortable with the format.

Frames are sometimes difficult to find. We live in a rectangular world where walls and windows are usually rectangular.  I needed a 6″ x 6″ frame quickly and had a really hard time finding one, except online.

A square painting hung alone alone sometimes begs to have a partner. Paired paintings or groupings of square paintings create a nice decor element.

Pros: Personally, I like how the eye travels through a square format. Almost like a Pac-man hitting one side, traveling up to the other and down again. The square feels tight, visually. For still lifes, I think it is almost easier to create a sense of balance in a square format.

Decorators seem to love squares. It is a very common motif used in home design. A single square painting seems to bring a calmness and stability to a place.

I once read that the square is a man-made shape, that not much in nature is square. That’s pretty true. Squares combine to make bigger squares. They have a sense of order and completeness.  How about painting on a square format?  I usually employ the rule of thirds, keeping my focal point at one of the intersections if we drew a tic-tac-toe inside the square. Or, I will keep sky or land in upper or lower third. Unless, I don’t! Sometimes, an image lends itself to a square, like the grouping of trees above. They create a vignette aided by the square format, forcing the viewers eye up to the sky.

Apparently, social media LOVES squares! Instagram-square. Apple icons-square.  We like squares. Squares seem to be very hip at the moment! Who knows what’s next? Circle, get ready…..!

What are your thoughts? Are you a square painter?

Pulp FIction