Why produce a series of paintings?

Lisa David, The Chase

Lisa David, The Chase, 16″ x 20″. Remember chasing the ice cream man with your dollar?

We all have them – our personal favorite painting, the baby, the one painting you were born to paint! Sometimes, we get lucky. Perfect combination of subject, composition, value structure, color harmony – it just works. That one painting may inspire an entire series. Before you know it, your authentic self as a painter, your style, shows itself. That’s what happened to me. The Chase is a painting of two kids wearing nothing but swim trunks chasing an ice cream truck. Everyone remembers the excitement of hearing the ice-cream truck’s song fill the neighborhood. “ICE CREAM MAN!”, we would scream, then run to find loose change and hope he didn’t get away. That painting has set the course for most of my work since. Childhood memories infiltrate everything I paint. If you are struggling with finding your voice and distinguishing yourself as an artist, maybe your favorite painting can be an inspiration for a series.

Below: Images from the “Summer as it was…” series.

Over the past five years, I have immersed myself into several series of paintings rooted in memory, specifically childhood memories. They have produced enough work for galleries, shows and studio sales. I’ve done a series of 70 small paintings about summer in the 1960’s and 1970’s; a series of ten summer drinks from the 1960’s and 1970’s; a series of 28 paintings of family on a 28-day road trip in 1972. Currently, I am working on a series of 12 paintings about school in the era of Dick and Jane.

 

Below: Images from the “Summer Refreshment” series.

pinklemonade

Frozen Pink Lemonade, 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel Remember the sound the frozen lemonade concentrate would make as it left the can and the stickiness it made all over the counter?

coke and a smile

Coke and a Smile. 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel Remembering just how refreshing an ice cold Coke can be.

File_000

(Mr. Harvey’s) Suntea , 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel My 5th grade teacher made us suntea in a big glass jar. It would marinate in the window all morning long. We drank it out of little Dixie papercups.

Tubosoda

Tub O’ Soda, 10″ x 10″ Oil on panel That time I won a green raft for the 3-legged race at my Dad’s company picnic. There were tubs of soda like I had never seen before!

Prior to painting, I threw pots. Lots of pots. I was a production potter throwing hundreds of pounds of clay a week fulfilling orders for gift shops all over the country and abroad. I had 18 sales reps selling my wares at wholesale prices which barely left any profit for all my hard work. My passion turned to excruciating work and before I knew it, I resented dry hands, sore back and the constant hum of my pottery wheel. I barely slept. Something had to change. I decided to paint. Years later, the same principles that helped me produce shelves of pottery helped me produce series of paintings.

Lisa David Summer of 72 poster image

Lisa David, Summer of 72 A family goes on a 28 day roadtrip; Some real memories, some imagined.

It’s satisfying to complete a body of work, a series of paintings. It feels good to have paintings for galleries, shows and sales. It also feels good to tell people what you are working on. Here are a few tips to help you if you want to tackle a series of paintings:

  1. Determine the number, size and subject of a series. Set parameters about when you will finish (a painting a day, season, month). Pick a good number, then use social media, blog, etc. so others can follow your journey. Make it a realistic number. The summer I painted one a day was a huge commitment.
  2. Source items if you’re doing still-lifes or take photo references combined with observational work. I keep a sketchbook and draw thumbnails for each image. I have bought a few rather bizarre things off eBay to paint, like an old metal ice-cube maker, pick-up stick game, even an old orange life preserver!
  3. Have gumption and stay with the idea until it is complete even if you doubt your skills and subject. I use the word “GUMPTION” as my mantra and listen to the Hans Zimmer song Gumption from the movie The Holiday! It keeps me painting through anything. There were times when I thought, am I nuts painting Tang, cinnamon toast or Yodels? I may be nuts, but at least I’m being authentic.
  4. Contact venues for showing your latest series. Tell people what you are painting.
  5. Set up for success: order supplies to see it through, clean your studio before you start, plan times to paint, tell your family that you’ve decided to make the commitment. Take the series seriously.
  6. Enjoy every second – painting is the good stuff!
  7. And remember, if something is important to you, you will find a way. If not, you will find an excuse.

Happy Painting…and give Gumption a try!

If artists were flowers…

I was in the grocery store over the weekend and wandered into the flower section. Maybe I’m just longing for spring, but the grocery store flowers all seemed to say, “pick me, pick me!” There were so many beautiful bouquets waiting for their escape out of the store. Every variety of flower looked glorious. Even the baby’s breath!

It got me thinking of the incredible variety of flowers and I realized artists are like flowers.  Each one is unique. A bouquet of all the same kind of flowers seems a bit boring. Even a bouquet of long stem roses. I would rather have a bouquet of all different kinds of flowers than just roses.

Thank God artists also come in an assortment of varieties!  So, if you were a flower, what kind of flower would you be?  Maybe you are like a rose? Do you paint classic subjects? Are you an established, classic artist? Maybe you excel in realism? Some artists are like zinnias with their bold use of color. Some are like the lilies of the valley- so fragile and tucked into shady areas, yet their paintings can fill a room with their presence like fragrance. Some painters are like morning glories. They reach for the sun and bloom in the golden hour. Some artists are like sunflowers. They grow all summer long and hit their stride as fall approaches; sunny, bright, and optimistic. Some artists are like impatiens. They want to bloom quickly. Maybe you’re a forget-me-not who just wants to be remembered for something. And all you wildflowers? You’re the plein air painters! Finding beauty everywhere, able to grow among the rocks and weeds. With Spring around the corner, I hope this post brightens your day. Now go treat yourself with a bouquet of sunshine!

 

Nobody sees a flower really; it is so small. We haven’t time, and to see takes time – like to have a friend takes time. Georgia O’Keeffe
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/georgia_okeeffe_134583?src=t_flower

Every flower must grow through dirt.     

Laurie Jean Sennott